Skip to main content

About your Search

20121121
20121129
Search Results 0 to 22 of about 23
outcomes. >> as we can come you talk with senator tom corps coburn about the fiscal cliff and the future of the republican party on both tvs and dad. the senator has written several books. live at noon eastern on c-span2 on "in depth." the u.s. has dropped out of next week's middle east talks iran had agreed to attend. former carter administration national security adviser spoke about the ongoing stalemate between the u.s. and iran over its nuclear program and explain why a why attacking iran should not be an option. this is about 40 minutes. >> the next speaker does not need any introduction and anything. one of the greatest statesmen alive, has had to deal with iran extensively from managing the relationship with the shot to the hostage crisis to the 1979 revolution itself and the ongoing conversation of how to deal with the nuclear challenge over on. president obama referred to him as one of the most outstanding figures and he presented him with the presidential medal of freedom in 1981. i have been tremendously grateful to benefit from his insight. a strong opponent of the invasion o
hope so. what i would like to do is to say that the fiscal cliff issue we have been talking about all they hear -- all week, is really important and we have to make progress right now towards a sustainable budget. a lot of experts sitting here about why that is important but based on our work there's a much broader competitiveness problem facing the u.s. right now. has been building for decades, it is not a recession, it has been building for decade-sapping the ability of the american economy to grow, and the average american to rise. to make the u.s. less competitive, less attractive for business, we go back to the fiscal cliff discussion over and over again because unless we get the economy really moving and growing in a long run, these budget problems will occur over and over again. we have identified eight areas where we find, these things would move the needle in a reasonable time frame, two or three or four years we start to see impact and there's quite bipartisan support. and the sustainable budget compromise. number 2, easing immigration now. we need a broader immigration refo
about the fiscal cliff and it is a very important issue. to resolve that issue? today in the third grade it seems n.y. chicago and detroit, kids of being condemned to a life that is going to be very humbling and very frustrating because i know for effect those kids are not going to be able to read, they are not going to be able to compete and they will not be able to make up in some miraculous way in the twelfth grade. so having this twist of focusing on national security may lead the country to understand if we don't get off of the path we are on we are on a path to a very different kind of america and the person who deserves enormous credit for driving this task force is secretary rice. [applause] >> let's talk about what it would take to close the gap between where we are and where we ought to be. one way to think of it is basic skills. one thing we decided the council on foreign relations is a large issue of content. what got me to this point is when i talked at the kennedy school, non american students knew more about american civics and the basis of american foreign policy than ame
.m. majority whip dick durbin will talk about the so-called fiscal cliff and deficit reduction at the center for american progress. fiscal cliff, a combination of those expiring tax provisions and budget cuts that could take place the beginning of the new you. they include the bush-era tax cuts and sequestration. live coverage starts at 1130 eastern also on c-span. we are likely to about the fiscal cliff during the senate session today getting underway at 10 a.m. eastern, just over a half hour from now. after the gavel and majority leader reid will be recognized to speak and will likely outlined the schedule for the day which could include debate on defense programs and policy, and possibly legislation to do with equal rights, people with disabilities. centers will us from 12:30-2:15 eastern for weeks the party meetings. live coverage of the senate and members gavel in right here on c-span2. right now some debate from the floor of the senate yesterday between majority leader reid and republican leader mitch mcconnell. d, w they talkede about potentialit't changes to filibuster rules. here's
like we're about, we're approaching a fiscal cliff, and this is all going to the happen shortly after or just prior to the inauguration or some time in january. what, what is the, what do you see or what do you predict or what needs to be done to avoid this fiscal cliff? >> okay. happily, i don't have to decide. [laughter] and i don't know. but, i mean, the fiscal cliff is a euphemism. i mean, it's financial. it's the basic financial soundness of the government which connects, believe me, to the value of everything you have, a house, a bank account, an investment and so forth. and it is all in jeopardy. it should be called the financial time bomb. and it's tax increases, it's spending cuts, but it's also what i spent a lot of time in the price of politics writing about where you have to extend the debt ceiling. they, the white house, whoever is there, is going to have to go to the congress and say, gee, you know what? we're borrowing a trillion dollars. i mean, think about, i was trying to figure somebody was asking, well, how much is a trillion dollars? that's about $3,000 for everyo
at different levels. we are now facing biggest threat through sequestered. janet mentioned the fiscal cliff in one part of the fiscal cliff is these across-the-board spending cuts to take effect january 2nd. it's going to be an 8.2% across-the-board cut in education, job training and health, housing, fbi, air traffic controllers from the food safety, entire range of domestic programs. for education if you count headstart, which is at the department of health and human services a $4.8 billion cut would be the largest education cuts ever in the history of the country. that would just move us -- essentially move us backwards on whether the goal is closing achievement gaps come increasing high school graduation rates, increasing college access and college completion. our biggest challenge in the short-term this lame-duck lame-duck session this to work together with groups like the urban league and national council to come up with a balanced approach to deficit reduction. as genocide, as people who can pay more to do so without balancing the budget on the backs of children and students and worki
and didn't. >> we weren't going to get the negotiations required to sail off of the fiscal cliff. >> there's the tax hike romney's question i consider them very different projects. obama is trying to put them together. the same way he wants you to -- what i hear is that one or all of them will be sailing off january 1st and the quit jumping medicare because they get 30% less i believe the member is the payroll taxes go up which weeks all the people of that have never heard of the sequester. i am having a very difficult time visualizing with what february looks like when the press gets a hold of this and then all of a sudden we also have the debt limit. i just can't see what we are going to do. >> the debt limit is an additional tool to explain to obama that he isn't the king and like henry viii you have to go to the parliament for money. he might want to nationalize monastery's but i don't think he can get as much these days as back then with that approach so he has to go to the parliament, has to go to congress for the resources for the debt ceiling, for all of these things. and look it w
to divert the so-called fiscal cliff. robert greifeld speaking at the brookings institution in washington on monday. last friday% obama met to discuss a plan for avoiding the fiscal cliff. [inaudible conversations] >> good afternoon. my name is glenn hutchins. a vice-chairman networking spirit of i'd like to welcome everybody here today. congressman oxley, great pleasure to see you. i've got to cut our remarks on sarbanes-oxley now. it is my great pleasure to welcome my colleague and friend, bob greifeld, cto of nasdaq to brookings. there's no doubt he's a successful business executive under his two valued brookings has increased by a factor of four. six dollars per share to $25 per share. gone up to 1.7 million. cash from 800 million major and is taken over the niche market in the united states and made it one of the most important global markets. 10 clearinghouses around the world. that is the facts. those are very straightforward and he is a track record to be proud of. the market he is built, however, is the reason why we've asked them to be here today. the nasdaq stock market list 32
. >> this weekend talk with oklahoma senator tom coburn about the fiscal cliff, the affordable care act and the future of the republican party on "book tv"'s in depth. the senator written several books and reports including the latest, the debt bomb. join the conversation with calls, e-mails and tweets comements and for doctor, senator tom coy burn. sunday noon eastern on "book tv"'s in depth on c-span2. >>> up next, for-profit practitioners discuss the role of private enterprise in public education. they lose also look at the obama administration approach to education reform. that was hosted yesterday at the american enterprise institute in washington. it is 90 minutes. >> hi. welcome, thanks for joining us. whether you're here at home, hope everybody had a terrific thanksgiving. i know that we're just getting back and, so the energy level is probably going to be, mellow, which we'll make that work for us, since we're going to talk about what sometimes is contentious subject. today's panel is on the question of for-profits and federal education policy. this is a topic that we ad aei ha
>> coming up, a look at how wall street is preparing for the fiscal cliff. our guest is dominique chu of "washington journal." in a few moments on the communicators from a look at how hurricane sandy effective emergency communications. in 40 minutes, it chief justice john roberts on the supreme court and constitutional law. and while looking at china's political and economic and military power, and another on the situation in syria. >> one of the major effects on hurricane sandy was on telecommunications. that is our topic today on "the communicators." christopher guttman-mccabe is our guest today. mr. christopher guttman-mccabe, overall, what was the effect of hurricane sandy on your organization, verizon, sprint, at&t and etc. >> guest: thank you. i wouldn't mind taking a step back and providing a little perspective on this storm and the impact it had. mayor bloomberg said that the damage was unprecedented. but it may be the worst storm that the city has ever faced. and the previous title search, it was 14 feet. governor chris christie said the damage was unthinkable. we have bu
duck session is the so-called fiscal cliff. tonight on c-span we'll she you some of the august 2011 debate and news conferences from the u.s. house, the senate and the white house as congress considered and passed the budget control act. this is the law that created sequestration, the automatic spending cuts that are split 50/50 between defense and nondefense spending. here's a look at senate democrats talking to reporters about the passage of the bill. >> it was long, it wasn't easy. for weeks the american people have watched and wondered whether congress could get its job done. well, we got it done and brought our economy back from the brink of disaster. in the end, the two sides came together. that's how our system works. neither side got what they wanted, each side laments some of the things we had to give up, but that's the way it is. it's that way because that's how our system works, that's what compromise is all about. it was a bipartisan compromise. it wasn't the right-wing cap, cut and whatever it is over there. that was not bipartisan. it's nothing that we could agree to.
know, i think what i'd like to do is just to frame this up a little bit to say this fiscal cliff that we've been talking about all day here and talking about all week is really important. and we have to make progress right now towards a sustainable budget, and we've got a lot of experts sitting here about why that's important. but based on our work, there is a much broader competitiveness problem facing the u.s. right now. it's been building for decades. this is not something new, it's not a recession. it's been building for decades, and it's sapping the ability of the american economy to grow, and it's sapping the ability of the standard of living for the average american to rise. and unless we start tackling the real core issues that are making the u.s. less competitive and less attractive as a location for wiz, we're going to -- for business, we're going to go back to the fiscal cliff discussion over and over again. unless we can get our economy really moving and growing in the long run, these budget problems just are going to recur over and over again. based on our work, we h
of automatic cuts in spending. necessity of resolving these issues is what ben bernanke refers to as a fiscal cliff. it is likely these critical decisions will be given brief extensions so that the next president and congress will be saddled with making the decisions. as a second term president, obama would face obstacles rarely experienced by achieved executive returning to office where he would face sizable numbers of members of the senate and house who will not compromise. these present ominous clouds on the horizon for a second term for obama. other lessons obama and the electorate can learn from the experience of presidential history might give guidance for the resolution of this concern. first, however, it would be helpful to review obama's background and customary evaluation of him. his opponents and some of his supporters asked does barack obama have the leadership skills, experience, cultural background and temperament to deserve a second term as president of the united states? his opponents say no to all of the above and add they consider him to have socialist tendencies including h
in the bill is intended to restore fiscal cliff responsibility and accountability for defense spending at a time when our nation simply cannot afford to waste taxpayers' funds on speculative green initiatives like solyndra and dozens of other companies that are floundering or bankrupt despite billions of government investment as they call it. a recent d.o.d. report revealed that the biofuels program will amount to an extra $1.8 billion a year in fuel costs for the navy alone. that's just the navy, not the air force, not the rest of it. now, this lewd crews price tag is not surprising through -- ludicrous price tag is not surprising. we found in 2009 -- listen this is significant. the navy paid an outrageous $424 a gallon for 20,000 gallons of renewable diesel and in december of 2011, the navy purchased 450,000 gallons of biofuel for $12 million equaling about $27 a gallon. that's $27 a gallon we're talking about in our defense budget that we're paying for something that should cost $3, maybe $4 a gallon. the navy is not the only service being sunld to this -- subjected to this greening
so. framing it up a little bit, the fiscal cliff issue we talk about all day here, and talking about all week, is really important, and i we have to make progress w towards a sustainable budget, and there's a lot of experts sitting here why it's important. based on our work, there is a much broader competitiveness problem facing the u.s. right now. it's been building for decades. it's not something new. it's not a recession. it's been building for decades, and it's sapping the ability of the american economy to grow, and it's sapping the ability of the standard of living for the average american to rise, and unless we start tackling the real core issues that are making the u.s. less competitive and less attractive for locations for business, we'll go back to the fiscal cliff discussion over and over again. unless we get the economy moving and growing in the long run, these budget problems just are going to recur over and over again. based on our work, we have identified eight areas, as you mentioned, where we find broad consensus where we believe that these things would really move t
are dim negotiations to avert the so-called fiscal cliff. live coverage of the senate here on c-span2. >> if you listen to mayor bloomberg who said that the damage was unprecedented, that it may be the worst storms of the city has ever faced and the tidal surge, previous high was 10 feet for the storm. it was 14. governor christie said the damage in new jersey was unthinkable. we had fires. we had hurricane force winds. we had massive flooding. we had snow. if you look at that and look at the flooding in the the subway systems that the shutdown of the stock exchanges. you start to get the sense a massive scale and scope of this storm. and yet the networks performed. i mean, i've read dozens of stories over the last couple of weeks about how for many consumers their only link to information, their only tie to any sort of information or to people was through their smartphone. linking social media and their smartphone. so while there was an impact on cell sites, i think the networks performed really, really pretty well spent by a assessment here is some networks did well, some networks d
tom coburn about the fiscal cliff, affordable care act, and the future of the republican party on senator wrote several books and reports like "the debt bomb," and join our three hour conversation with calls, e-mails, tweets, and facebook comments for senator tom coburn for booktv's "in-depth" on c-span2. >>> next, john roberts on challenges and surprises he had on the high court. last month, he spoke for an hour with students about the supreme court and constitutional law. [applause] >> thank you very much. thank you, and thank you, david, for that gracious introduction, and all of you for a very, very warm welcome. this is my first visit to rice, and i'm already glad that i came. president lee told you i can't talk about anything current, future, or past. [laughter] my remarks will be brief. [laughter] i had the pleasure of knowing david for 35 years. as he mentioned, he was the president back then too of the harvard law review. he's used to holding the reigns of power. a chief justice also holds the reigns of power. the only difference is that a chief justice has to hold the
with oklahoma senator tom coburn about the fiscal cliff, affordable care act and the future of the republican party on booktv's "in depth." he has written several books and reports including his latest, the debt mama. join our conversation, your calls, e-mails and tweets and facebook comments for medical doctor, author and senator coburn on c-span2. >> [inaudible conversations] >> good morning. if i could ask are going to take their seats. welcome to the arms control association the national american council titled iran 2013, making diplomacy work. i'm the president of the national american council and welcome to all our viewers on c-span as well. it's been almost exactly four years since president obama's a famously extended his hand of friendship and hope the iranians would unclench their fists. yet today after a few rounds of diplomacy, plenty more sanctions and centrifuge, there are plenty of clinched this on both sides and very little talk about friendship. there's been an attempt at diplomacy but political constraints on both sides have been difficult to advance an old habits are diffic
will focused on the so-called fiscal cliff and the bush era tax rates. our guest will include alex from the mesh enterprise substitute and e than poll lick with the economic policy substitute. washington journal is live on c-span every day at 7:a.m. eastern. >>> on 16 or 17 bases in the united states we have military -- [inaudible] the average cost to agent dmield that school per year is $50,000. almost four times what the rest of the public education costs. and many -- the vast majority of our bases we use public schools. we can take the money we're spending today, pay every public school system $1 4,000 per child and save billions of dollars per year. and with the same or better outcomes. >>> this weekend you can take with oklahoma stater tom coburn about the fiscal cliff. on booktv in-depth. the senator is written several books including the latest "the debt bomb" join the three-hour conversation your call, e-mails, face and comments. live sunday at noon eastern on booktv in-depth on c-span2. >>> former florida governor jeb bush called for higher education standards in the u.s. deliv
center holds a form when dan the so-called fiscal cliff and with the current congress can learn from the 1990 budget deal between president george h.w. bush and democrat. we'll be live starting at 9:00 a.m. eastern on their companion network from the c-span 3. >> now, from secretary of state, condoleezza rice and former chancellor of new york city public schools, scholl klein discussed the educational system and its impact on national security. part of a two-day summit with policymakers and education leaders, hosted by the foundation for excellent education. it's about an hour. [applause] >> welcome to this evening broadcast on morning joe. the energy and thus are a visceral testament to writing two things. one aside the issue of educational reform has ripened. it's a combination of need, the talent we see in this term has coalesced around this issue to detect elegies, but there is a sense that the moment has arrived. and the other is 73 bush. [applause] i am a great believer that two things matter in life. one of the idea and the others people. that's the real driver of change, the
been talking about the fiscal cliff this morning. >> guest: one of the things we need to do is massively cut the military budget across-the-board. the hard part is when it comes to bases in the united states because those bases always provide some kind of jobs in the local community and it makes it harder for members of congress. not the case for bases abroad. we could close almost all of them and not make us any less safe. the bases abroad don't make us any less safe. sending contractors to take a place of soldiers don't keep us safe are going to cut all of that and use the money to help those countries build their own economies and bring the money home for health health health cr jobs to rebuild the environment here at home. >> host: phyllis bennis from the institute for policy studies, appreciate you coming by. >> guest: thank coming up next to discussion among baby boomers and encore careers. marc freedman with a new book "the big shift" navigating the new stage beyond midlife talks about the need for savings plans for peoples in their 50's, 60's and 70's for meaningful
responsibility given the fiscal plight that we are in in careening toward the cliff. in deference to his colleagues, the time frame here, he said he understands that it will be virtually unanimous vote, despite his question, which is legitimate. i think we all ought to consider. but that was rejected. the response to somebody, i think, who was trying to be deferential to the senator from vermont and his proposals sort of is put in the position where it looks like he's not trying to be conscious of the situation that exists here. i just think he asked a legitimate question that all of us, given our current fiscal situation, ought to give due consideration to. with that, i yield back and thank the senator from arizona. the presiding officer: the senator from vermont. mr. leahy: i would note that this is not an expansion by any means. simply reforms that's already law and adds no cost -- no cost, no federal cost. if i could have the attention of the senator from indiana. this is not an expansion. it is a reform of programs we have. it is of no cost to the federal taxpayers. and, mr. preside
confident that if we reach some sort of other spending limit agreement to avoid a fiscal cliff that we won't just before the ink is dry start violating it. after all it only takes 60 votes. so i think it's a very important issue. at ranking republican on the budget committee, when we make an agreement, i think we ought to adhere to it and this is why we had a difficulty with the bill. i enjoy working with senator tester. i've had good conversation with majority leader reid. hopefully something can be worked out to fix this problem. i thank the chair and would yield the floor. the presiding officer: the clerk will call the roll. quorum call: quorum call: mr. levin: mr. president? the presiding officer: the senator from michigan. mr. levin: i would ask unanimous consent that the quorum call be called off. the presiding officer: without objection. mr. levin: mr. president i ask unanimous consent the senate proceed to a period of morning business with senators permitted to speak for up to ten minutes each. the presiding officer: without objection. mr. levin: i ask unanimous consent the judicia
Search Results 0 to 22 of about 23